Awards & recognition

The 20/20 Trust’s digital literacy projects and programmes have received over 20 national and international awards and placings.

  • 2011 Human Rights Commission – Computers in Homes: Superior award for Computers in Homes and Stepping Up
  • 2010 Human Rights Commission – Computers in Homes: 100,000 Challenge
  • 2010 Human Rights Commission – Computers in Homes: Participant in Diversity Action programme
  • 2009 Price Waterhouse Coopers New Zealand Tech Awards- eDay (now a separate Trust): Winner
  • 2009 Wellington Airport Regional Community Awards – Computer Access New Zealand (now a separate Trust): Supreme Winner
  • 2009 Wellington Airport Regional Community Awards – Computer Access New Zealand (now a separate Trust): Winner in Heritage & Environment Category
  • 2008 Green Ribbon Awards – eDay (now a separate Trust): Winner of Community action for the environment – Volunteers and not-for-profit organisations
  • 2008 Human Rights Commission – Participant in Diversity Action programme
  • 2007 Human Rights Commission – Computers in Homes: Providing computers to Burmese refugee families
  • 2007 Human Rights Commission – Participant in Diversity Action programme
  • 2006 DELL Certificate of Appreciation
  • 2006 DELL Outstanding Contribution – Computer Access New Zealand (now a separate Trust)
  • 2004 Computerworld Excellence Awards – Computers in Homes: Winner of Bang for the Buck
  • 2004 Computerworld Excellence Awards – Computers in Homes: Finalist in Excellence in the Use of IT in Education: Tertiary, Community and Commercial
  • 2003 Global Knowledge Partnership (GKP) “Cyber Oscars” – Living Heritage: Finalist in Culture category
  • 2003 World Summit Awards – Living Heritage: Finalist
  • 2003 Computerworld Excellence Awards – Computers in Homes: Finalist in Excellence in the Use of IT in Education: Tertiary, Community and Commercial
  • 2002 Stockholm Challenge Award – Living Heritage: Finalist
  • 2002 Global Junior Challenge – Living Heritage: Finalist

Other recognition

The most important and rewarding recognition is when our initiatives are seen as worthy of more widespread adoption in New Zealand and continued support – whether by programme participants, other community groups and trusts, local or central government, businesses, philanthropic organisations, academic researchers, individuals or others.

Some 20/20 Trust projects have been held up as models in government papers and initiatives – such as the New Zealand Digital Strategy; some have become mainstream  – for example the computer cabling of schools; and some others become programmes receiving support from successive governments and budget – in particular Computer in Homes.